Toki Minoyaki official site|Toki JAPAN Brand Ceramics

EN
TOKI MINOYAKI STORY
Story29
Adding modern taste to traditional Momoyama style Minoyaki
Yozan gama
Masashi Mizuno
陽山窯 水野 雅之
Profile
Yozan gama
Masashi Mizuno
614-2 Jorinji, Izumi-cho, Toki city, Gifu, 〒509-5102
TEL +81-572-54-5343
http://www.ob.aitai.ne.jp/~yozangama/index.html
Yozan gama.
Yozan gama
Producing tea ware for tea ceremonies
Yozangama is located in Izumi-cho, Toki City. Mr. Masashi Mizuno, third generation of the pottery, was awarded the 37th Takuo Prize by the Mino Ceramic Society in 2019. This award is given to those who have made efforts in fostering Mino ceramic art and excellent artist activities. He was born in Toki City in 1957 and has been recognized for his wide range of activities, including the creation of original Murasaki-Shino, Ko -Mino, and Minoyama ceramics, while preserving the historic kiln that was used by the first and second generations to make offerings of Minoyaki to the imperial family. Mr. Mizuno, who holds the title of Assistant Professor of the Urasenke School of Tea Ceremony and also teaches tea ceremony himself, mainly produces Chato, ceramics used in the tea ceremony. He is busy making pottery as he participates in exhibitions all over Japan, but he does not talk much about the process of making his works. “There is no need to talk about my hardships. The work tells you everything.” The creative activities of the artist Mizuno Masashi can be said to be a succession of inheritance of the tradition and culture of Mino-Momoyama pottery and innovation of adding a modern taste to it.
Yozan gama
Pottery honored the name of “Nobunaga Ware”
The roots of Minoyaki go back to the Azuchi-Momoyama period (1573-1603). Originally, the Mino region had a history of pottery making for over 1,400 years, and was blessed with resources such as mountain slopes suitable for building kilns, soil for materials, and red pine for firewood. The land was also suitable for transportation to Kyoto and Osaka. Oda Nobunaga, the “Shogun” (ruler during feudal Japan) of the time, took note of this and encouraged the movement of potters to Mino, linking the tea ceremony with political power and providing a foothold for the unification of Japan. After the “Honnoji Incident” in Tensho 10 (1582), the tea ceremony was further developed by Shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi, his chief advisor, Sen no Rikyu, and Furuta Oribe. Until then, the mainstream of tea ceremony utensils were Chinese arabesques, but Nobunaga’s industrial promotion measures led to the birth of many famous bowls. In the modern era, tea ware named “Kiseido,” “Setoguro,” “Shino,” and “Oribe” became the foundation of Minoyaki that continues to this day. Mr. Mizuno calls them “Nobunaga ware” named after Nobunaga, the founder of the Minoyaki industry. The true meaning of this name is not only the color and shape of the ware, but also the challenge to do something completely new that no one has ever tried before. “It takes about ten years before I am satisfied with one style,” he says, “and when I get close to the ideal in ten years, it takes another ten years for the next style. That’s about how long it takes.” Mastering traditional techniques and completing a piece of pottery to his own satisfaction cannot be achieved overnight.
Yozan gama
Giving Form to the unique Japanese Sense of Beauty
When I gently picked up one of Mr. Mizuno’s pottery, I was surprised at how light it was which was hard to imagine from its bold appearance. After molding, he takes his time to remove unnecessary parts from the outside and inside of the bowl to make it lighter, so women may easily hold it as well. Mr. Mizuno’s aesthetic sense is also reflected in the asymmetrical pottery created by hand. In Japan, there is a culture and sensibility that asymmetry is beautiful. Of course, perfectly balanced things are beautiful. However, there is an indescribable beauty to be found in a form in which imbalances are harmonized in perfect balance. In addition, the artist also shows his talent in color. For example, the emerald green shade of Oribe glaze is impressive in “Rainbow Colored Clouds”. Like clouds bathed in sunlight, beautiful rainbow colors appear depending on the angle of the light. This is another expression of beauty that can only be found in Mr. Mizuno, who respects the Japanese people’s unique sense of beauty, such as a sense of season and emotion. Finally, Mr. Mizuno names each of his finished works. The black Seto teacup, with its sturdy appearance, is named “Ikkan”, the Shino teacup, which expresses the spirit of calmly approaching things, is named “kokoroshizukani”, and the black Oribe teacup, with its “0, △, □” painted on it, is named “Heijoshin”, which expresses the idea of “not being attached, not being obsessed, not being caught up”. These are derived from the Zen philosophy that is closely connected with the tea ceremony. The work is finally completed when it is given a name.
Yozan gama
Yozan gama
The importance of hospitality as seen in a Tea Ceremony
The tea ceremony is a traditional style of inviting important people and serving them a light meal, sake, and tea. In addition to the decoration of the tea room, the aesthetics of the utensils, and the tea ceremony, the spiritual exchange between the host and the guest is also important. Of these, the most important is the spirit of hospitality toward the guest. Mr. Mizuno, who is well versed in the tea ceremony, always has the presence of the guest at the forefront of his work. That is why the weight, shape, and concave shape fit comfortably in the hand, and the cup is soft and comfortable to drink from. “There are some things that can only be understood by actually experiencing discomfort at a tea ceremony, not just by imagining it. The utensils created in this way are the very spirit of the tea ceremony to entertain guests. Mr. Mizuno has a message for the young people who will lead the next generation. “It’s a very tough industry. However, the future era will be created by the youth of the future. I hope that they will continue to incorporate their own senses into Minoyaki.” By continuing to take on new challenges, we are building a new era. This attitude reminds me of Nobunaga Oda, who brought many innovations to the existing social model.
TOKI MINOYAKI STORY
藤山窯 加藤 賢治
TOHZAN GAMA
Kenji Kato
陽山窯 水野 雅之
YOZAN GAMA
Masashi Mizuno
正陶苑 祐山窯 正村 祐也
SHOTOEN
Kanji & Yuya Masamura
春山製陶有限会社 加藤 雅憲
SYUNZAN SEITO
Masahiro Kato
真山窯 伊藤 浩一郎
SINZAN GAMA
Koichiro Ito
樹窯 川合 正樹
TATSUKI GAMA
Masaki Kawai
有限会社豊大窯 伊藤 仁
HOUDAI GAMA
Hitoshi Ito
快山窯 塚本 満
KAIZAN GAMA
Mitsuru Tsukamoto
有限会社丹山窯 H&Mクラフト丹羽 正廣
TANZAN GAMA H&M CRAFT
Masahiro Niwa
鈴木陶苑 鈴木 哲平
SUZUKI TOUEN
Suzuki Teppei
カク仲 白石 文伸
KAKUNAKA
Shiraishi Bunshin
昭和製陶株式会社 加藤 源一郎
SHOWA SEITO
Genichiro Kato
知山窯 安藤 統
CHIZAN GAMA
Osamu Ando
丹山窯 丹羽 哲男
TANZAN GAMA
Niwa Tetsuo
Maruchu Inc. Hironao Sakai
MARUCHU
Hironao Sakai
角山製陶所 伊藤 真
KAKUYAMA SEITOJO
Makoto Ito
株式会社日本セラティ 鵜飼 研志
NIHON CERATY
Kenji Ukai
芳泉窯 有限会社カネ芳製陶所 北邑 宜丈
HOUSEN GAMA
Yoshitake Kitamura
株式会社カネセ 伊藤 洋介
KANESE
Yosuke Ito
伸光窯 金多田中製陶所 田中 一亮・久美子
SHINKOGAMA KANETA TANAKA
Kazuaki & Kumiko Tanaka
株式会社山功高木製陶 髙木 崇
YAMAKO TAKAGI POTTERY
Takashi Takagi
有限会社ヤマ亮横井製陶所 横井 亮一
YAMA RYO YOKOI POTTERY
Ryoichi Yokoi
有限会社 丸仙化学工業所 水野 寿昭
MARUSEN KAGAKU
Toshiaki Mizuno
美濃焼おかみ塾
MINOYAKI OKAMI JUKU
 
藤田陶器株式会社 藤田 裕子
FUJITA TOUKI
Yuko Fujita
SAKUZAN
Nobuyasu Takai
株式会社ロロ 早川 秀雄
LOLO
Hideo Hayakawa
金正陶器 澤田敦史
KANESHOTOKI
Atsushi Sawada
だち 窯やネット
DACHI KAMAYANET
 
カネコ小兵製陶所 伊藤 克紀
KANEKO KOHYO POTTERY
Katsunori Ito
Discover The TOKI MINOYAKI
more
SHARE ON